Brigitte Grisanti Wildflowers Smoky Mountains

Discover the beauty of the trails of the Great Smoky Mountains, covered with attractive pink petals of Spring beauty flowers delivering the promise of warmer days to come. Tiny Bluets spread out in lengthy carpets along the edges of the trail, mirroring the clarity of the sky, while Flame Azaleas reflect the sunsets. Discover the natural world of wildflowers in the Great Smoky Mountains in all seasons.

The variety of latitudes, elevations, and settings means that visitors to the trails of the Great Smoky Mountains, even if they are casual walkers, day hikers, weekenders or long -distance travelers, have the opportunity to discover the beauty that comes from the grand diversity of flowers to be found.

The wildflowers of the Great Smoky Mountains are amazing in their diversity. The National Park is home to approximately 1,500 kinds of different flowering plants, including over 300 rare plants. The reason for the large number of species is attributable to several factors, the variety of latitudes, elevations, settings, lots of rain, the impact of the ice age, and the preservation efforts by the National Park Service.

The Smoky Mountains are known for wildflowers. Spring flowers bloom late March to Mid May, including Spring Beauty, Trillium, Birdfoot Violets, Jack in the Pulpits, Dutchman Britches, Purple Phacalia and Snowy Orchis. During April through July you can find many wildflowers including, Rhododendron, Indian Pipe, Indian Pink, Mountain Laurel, Lady Slipper, Indian Paintbrush, Fire Pink, and Columbine. And throughout July into October there are many brillant colored wildflowers blooming throughout the park including, Yellow-Fringed Orchis, Bee Balm, Cardinal Flower, Monkshood, Jewel Weed, and Blue Gentian.

Where to find the wildflowers: quite walkways, hiking trails and auto touring areas offer great opportunities to view the wildflowers throughout the park.

http://www.knoxville-tn.com/flowers.html

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